Discovering the Indie Game

Discovering the Indie Game

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For this week’s assignment I played the Stanley Parable Demo. In the demo, a cheeky narrator guides you through a tour of an abandoned factory. The game features simple navigation (forward, back, left, right) and the ability to hit or pick up something and, of course,  drop it.  It also consists of a series of choices (this room or that, yes or no, listen to the narrator or go against his requests). And seems to lack any clear objective, and yet I found it rather compelling. It also played on the is-this-the-end-of-the-game motif. In general, you never really knew if you were at the end, beginning, or in a game at all.

 

A game mechanic that I would like to play with this semester is the ability for a player to not only have free movement in their game, but in the game next to them. If you have ever played a video game alongside a sibling or friend, you know the sweet satisfaction of bumping into them at the exact movement that they were trying to clear a jump or reach the final golden star. However, you need to maintain balance between messing up their game and focusing on your own. What if you took this physical interaction and brought it into the video game. The player on your screen could move to your friend’s, mess up their mission, and move back to your screen to complete your level.